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Department of Sociology, Anthropology and Crime and Delinquency Studies


Dr. Wyatt

    Gary Wyatt

     Associate Provost and Director of Honors College

     Office: 205 Plumb Hall

        Phone number: 620-341-5103

        Email: gwyatt@emporia.edu

        Education: Ph.D. Washington State University, 1988

 

On April 29, 2014, Dr. Gary Wyatt was named to a one-year appointment in a new position-associate provost and director of the Honors College. Wyatt has served as associate dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences since 2008. Information regarding the Honors College may be found at: www.emporia.edu/honors

Dr. Gary Wyatt has taught at Emporia State University since 1988. His areas of expertise include education, family and social psychology. He is the recipient of the 1998-1999 College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Annual Award for Excellence in Teaching and the 2006-2007 Award for Excellence in Scholarship. He has served as President of the Faculty of Emporia State University, Moderator of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Assembly, and as Chair of the General Education Council. While he continues to teach sociology courses, he also serves as Associate Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences where he directs the University’s General Education Program.

 

His research interests focus on the sociology of education.  He is the author of Family Ties: Relationships, Socialization and Homeschooling a book that relied on 10 years of field research among homeschooling families and he is currently completing a research project on cyber-bullying.  Above all else, he loves teaching, with his favorite courses being SO 101 Introduction to Sociology and SO 450 Research Methods. He enjoys camping, hiking, photography, reading and spending time with his family.

 

              Research Methods and Statistics student gives presentation at
                                          ESU Research and Creativity Day

Published Book:

Family Ties book Cover

Relying on a decade-long participant observation study, this book focuses on the salience of parent-child relationships for home schooling.  Those experiences with traditional schools emerge as a major motive for home schooling.  The quality of the relationships that develop between parents and children are the major predictor of a successful home schooling experience.  Comparing the socialization between traditional schooling and home schools, successful home schooling experience.  Comparing the socialization between traditional schooling and home schools, Family Ties: Relationships, Socialization and Home Schooling investigates significant controversies in these two separate environments.

 

“Will the kids really learn enough?  What will my in laws say? Tomorrow I could put them back in school and no one the wiser.  I will stress out over this tonight.  What am I doing to myself?  Will it really pay off in the long run?  (5: 42)