Archaeological Dig
Monopology game for Marriage and Family course
Pupply clinic
Child Abuse class exercise
Archaeological Dig

Welcome to the home page of the Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Crime and Delinquency Studies

Sociology and Crime and Delinquency Studies are two of the exciting programs we offer.  Faculty are committed teachers and scholars, who work closely with students to support their academic development and career trajectories.  Our curriculum is designed to ground students in the basics of sociology and crime and delinquency studies. Undergraduates have the opportunity to choose areas of concentration designed to meet each student's personal interests and needs.  Come and explore our undergraduate program in sociology and crime and delinquency studies and dive into careers in sociology, anthropology and crime and delinquency studies.

Internship placements earn students course credit, invaluable professional skills and provide excellent networking opportunities for future employment.

Mission Statement

The mission of the department is to provide students with an educational experience that will assist them in analyzing, and understanding human behavior and social arrangements.  Through completing the curriculum and engaging discipline-based scholarly activities, students will develop and sharpen academic knowledge and skills, and by so doing complete preparation for careers, graduate studies, and informed citizenship in a global society.  Consistent with the University's student centered mission, the department is committed to academic excellence, community and global involvement and professional fulfillment.

Sociology Program Learning Goals and Objectives

GOAL 1

To provide educational experiences that permit students to think sociologically. By completing the program students should be able to:

  • 1.1 Understand how the self develops sociologically and to explain the relationship between the individual and society. The students will examine the differences between sociology and other social behavioral sciences in terms of how each discipline explains individual and social behavior.
  • 1.2 Provide examples of how culture and social structure shape individual lives. Students will explore social problems such as poverty, racism, discrimination, inequality, etc. from different theoretical perspectives to examine their possibilities and limitations in explaining social and individual behavior.
  • 1.3 Demonstrate critical thinking skills, including analysis and synthesis of key sociological concepts and theories by providing an original analysis of a social problem or issue.
  • 1.4 Raise a sociologically relevant question and outline a process and method by which the question might be researched and answered.
  • 1.5 Critically evaluate published quantitative and qualitative research reports, scholarly articles, policies, and media information. Student should be able to evaluate the argument and evidence presented, the assumptions underlying the arguments, missing information, etc.
  • 1.6 Learn about the practical relevance and importance of sociological knowledge for understanding public opinion polls, governmental policies, and mass media reports by using different methodological techniques available in sociology.
  • 1.7 Identify practical and ethical issues involved with the study of human behavior by studying the ASA Code of Ethics, and through the incorporation of the ASA “Teaching Ethics Throughout The Curriculum” into the sociology curriculum, specifically into the Professional Development course (SO440).
  • 1.8 Effectively express and communicate sociological knowledge inside and outside the classroom.

GOAL 2

To provide opportunities for students to think sociologically and practice sociology by engaging in active learning projects and opportunities outside of the classroom. To achieve this goal students can participate in the following activities:
  • 2.1 Working at an internship or practicum through a community agency of their choice to develop a better understanding of the social forces that influence the behavior and decisions of those in the social service field, and to learn how social organizations and institutions operate. This also is an opportunity for the students to practice professional and ethical behavior in the work place.
  • 2.2 Become a member of one the Recognized Student Organizations (RSO) in the program including AKD (Sociology Honor Society), the Sociology Club, or any other RSO available on campus. Among other things, through their membership, sociology majors have an opportunity to engage in leadership roles, social advocacy, and in facilitating group interaction.
  • 2.3 Engage in field work experiences such as the summer archeological dig, conduct professional interviews, attend academically-based field trips and conferences, engaging in authentic research with a faculty member and participate in departmental academic extra-curricular activities. Through these and other opportunities students can improve their communication and social skills, and could learn to critically think like sociologists by doing sociology.
  • 2.4 Conduct an independent study under the supervision of a faculty member or contracting an honor course. These academic options give students an opportunity to improve their research skills by designing and engaging in a research project that would meet their particular academic interests and needs. At the same time, for some students these options provide an opportunity to prepare themselves for attending graduate school in sociology or related field.
  • 2.5 Participate in study abroad opportunities. Through this experience, students should be able to become aware of their own personal biases and reactions to people who are of a culture or background. It also is a way of practicing their cultural competency skills including respect, effective inter-cultural communication, and empathy.

GOAL 3

To assist students in the development of the ability to interact with people of different cultures and socio-economic backgrounds. Through the program curriculum, students should be able to:

  • 3.1 Gain knowledge about how social factors such as race, gender, sexuality, social class, and age, interact to structure and culturally frame social interaction and perceptions at the local, national, and global levels.
  • 3.2 Participate in in-class and outside the classroom learning activities that will provide for student’s interaction with people from different cultural and socio-economic backgrounds. Through this experience, students should be able to become aware of their own personal biases and reactions to people who are of a culture or background. It also is a way of practicing their cultural competency skills including respect, effective inter-cultural communication, and empathy.
  • 3.3 Critically examine their belief and value systems in light of current sociological and anthropological literature. Students will have the opportunity to examine the beliefs and values that shape their perception of reality by gathering information and analyzing data using the scientific method.
  • 3.4 Understand and apply cultural and theoretical perspectives on community issues and social problems. The students will be able to learn how to gather relevant information and data and how to analyze the evidence collected using the most appropriate scientific method. In addition, students will be able to learn about methods of disseminating their research findings to the public, the government and professionals in their area of investigation.

  • 3.5 Be informed about the American Sociological Association's Code of Ethics, and other professional codes of conducts in the social service field. The students will have the opportunity to explore ethical issues in sociology and related fields by discussing the ASA Code of Ethics, and through the incorporation of the ASA “Teaching Ethics Throughout The Curriculum” into the sociology curriculum, specifically into the Professional Development course (SO440).

Crime and Delinquency Studies Program Learning Goals and Objectives

GOAL 1

To provide educational experiences that enable students to understand the organization and operation of the adult and juvenile justice systems. By completing the program, students should be able to:

  • 1.1  Understand the relationships between the major agencies of the justice system, including the police, courts, and corrections.

  • 1.2  Understand the key concepts and theories in criminology and criminal justice.

  • 1.3 Understand the history of the criminal justice system.

  • 1.4 Understand the contemporary issues facing the criminal justice system, such as corruption, police brutality, racial profiling, and minority-disproportional contact.

  • 1.5 Understand the philosophies, theories, and policies guiding the criminal justice system, including those of rehabilitation, retribution, restitution, and incapacitation.

  • 1.6 Critically evaluate the different explanations regarding the nature, extent, causation, and prevention of crime and delinquency.

  • 1.7 Understand substantive and procedural criminal laws that regulate and guide the criminal justice system and its operation.

  • 1.8 Effectively express and communicate criminological and criminal justice knowledge inside and outside the classroom.

GOAL 2

To provide opportunities for students to think sociologically by engaging in active learning projects and opportunities in the fields of criminology and criminal justice. To achieve this goal, students can voluntarily participate in the following activities:

  • 2.1 Completing an internship with a criminal justice agency.

  • 2.2 Becoming a member of and participating in a nationally accredited professional organization such as the American Criminal Justice Organization, the American Correctional Association, and the American Society of Criminology.

  • 2.3 Engaging in fieldwork experiences such as police ride-along programs, attending academic field trips and conferences, and participating in academic and professional extracurricular activities.

  • 2.4 Conducting an independent study under the supervision of a faculty member or enrolling in an honors course.

  • 2.5 Participating in study abroad opportunities to develop a comparative perspective on crime and delinquency.

GOAL 3

To help students develop the ability to interact with and learn from people of different cultures and socioeconomic backgrounds. Through the program curriculum, students will be able to:       

  • 3.1 Gain knowledge about how social factors such as race, gender, sexuality, social class, and age influence interactions and perceptions related to crime and criminal justice at the local, national, and global levels.

  • 3.2 Critically examine their belief and value systems in light of current sociological and criminal justice literature and through their interactions with students of diverse cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds.

  • 3.3 Be informed about the American Sociological Association's Code of Ethics, the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences Code of Ethics, and other related fields.