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Jones Institute for Educational Excellence


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Jones Distinguished Lecture Series

Established in 1986, the Jones Distinguished Lecture Series brings to the campus of Emporia State University nationally recognized leaders in education. While on campus, the Jones Lecturers meet with small groups, visit classes, conduct open forums, and deliver a formal address that is open to the public.

Spring 2013 - MaryKay Orgill, Associate Professor of Chemistry at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas
  
photo - Orgill

7 p.m., April 18, 2013 Lecture

Topic: Sliding Toward Inquiry: Using the Essential Features of Inquiry to Improve Learning in the Laboratory Environment

Location:
Greek Room,
Memorial Union,
Emporia State University

FREE and Open to the Public

Lecture Sponsors: Jones Institute for Educational Excellence, ESU Departments of Physical Sciences, Phi Delta Kappa

Presentation Event Flier

In recent years, there has been a repeated call for science instructors to improve learning in the laboratory environment by modifying laboratory activities to make them less “cookbook” and more inquiry-oriented. But what does that mean? What is “inquiry?” What does it look like in a laboratory learning environment, and what can an instructor do to make a laboratory activity more inquiry-oriented? In this interactive lecture, we will discuss four historical laboratory instructional styles, their relationships to inquiry, variations of inquiry, and how instructors can use the “Five Essential Features of Inquiry” to make their laboratory activities more inquiry-oriented. 

MaryKay Orgill is an Associate Professor of Chemistry at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (USA). After a high school teacher told her that girls couldn’t “do chemistry,” she entered Brigham Young University as a chemistry major (BS '95). She was surprised to find that she actually liked chemistry—and loved teaching it; so she enrolled in a graduate program at Purdue University to study both biochemistry (MS '99) and chemical education (PhD '03). As a first-year faculty member with a joint appointment in biochemistry and science education at the University of Missouri-Columbia, she took on the extra challenge of teaching a high school chemistry class. In 2004, she moved to UNLV, where her research focuses on using qualitative methods to examine students’ understandings of chemistry and biochemistry concepts.


Spring 2011 - Yong Zhao, Presidential Chair and Associate Dean for Global Education, College of Education at the University of Oregon; Director, Center for Advanced Technology in Education; Fellow, International Academy for Education

Dr. Yong Zhao

Miss the live lecture?
View it online here >

February 23 Lecture

Topic:
American Education in the Age of Globalization

Lecture Sponsors:
ESU Special Events Board, Academic Enhancement Grants, Phi Delta Kappa, & the Department of Instructional Design & Technology

Presentation Event Flier

Presentation Event Program

January 26 Book Talk

Topic:
Discussion of Dr. Zhao’s book, Catching Up or Leading the Way

Book Talk Sponsors:
Flint Hills Chapter of Phi Delta Kappa

Book Talk Event Flier

At a time when globalization and technology are dramatically altering the world we live in, is education reform in the United States headed down the right path? Are schools emphasizing the knowledge and skills that students need in a global society? Are education systems in China and other countries really as superior as some people claim?

Born and raised in China and now a professor at the University of Oregon, Zhao bases many of his observations on extensive research and firsthand experience as a student in China and as a parent of children attending school in the United States. His unique perspective leads him to conclude that American education is at a crossroads and we need to change course to maintain leadership in a rapidly changing world.


October 12, 2010 - Joyce VanTassel-Baska
Joyce VanTassel-Baska

Topic:
Linking Aesthetic Principles to Teaching the Standards

Sponsors:
JDL Series and Department of Special Education & School Counseling

Event Flier

In an age of accountability, it is not uncommon to see aesthetics dropped from consideration in teaching to the standards. This lecture will focus on how to treat the arts as partners in developing cognitive skills in all areas of the curriculum. By merging the intent of the arts standards for appreciation and performance with core subject areas, we can illuminate deeper understanding of concepts and higher level skills of thinking and problem-solving. Illustrations of these ideas will be shared, using the visual arts and literature as key examples.

Joyce VanTassel-Baska is the Jody and Layton Smith Professor Emerita of Education and former Executive Director of the Center for Gifted Education at The College of William and Mary in Virginia where she developed a graduate program and a research and development center in gifted education. She also initiated and directed the Center for Talent Development at Northwestern University. She is the author and/or editor for numerous publications, including the Critical Issues in Equity and Excellence in Gifted Education Series published by NAGC. Her major research interests are on the talent development process and effective curricular interventions with the gifted.


November 18, 2009 - Leonard Marcus, Children’s Book Historian & Author

photo - Leonard Marcus

Book cover - Golden Legacy

Topic:
A New Deal for the Nursery: Golden Books and the Democratization of American Children’s Book Publishing

Sponsors:
JDL Series and ESU Archives

Event Flier

What should children read? This wide-ranging illustrated talk highlighted the key moments in a lively 300-yearold debate that has often made allies—or enemies—of the nation’s publishers, librarians, religious leaders, parents, and educators. Along the way, the genteel backwater that was once children’s book publishing somehow morphed into big business.

Special Exhibit
In conjunction with Mr. Marcus’ s lecture, there will be a special exhibit of original Caldecott-winning artwork from the ESU Archives’ May Massee collection.

Book signing, exhibit viewing & refreshments following the presentation. (Reception hosted by Phi Delta Kappa, Flint Hills Chapter.)

Additional Lecture for Educators: Leonard Marcus also presented a free lecture entitled, "Minders of Make-Believe: or, Children’s Book History in Ten Giant Steps from the New England Primer to Harry Potter."


March 10, 2009 - Rainer Martens

Rainer Martens

Martens book - Successful Coaching

Topic:
Joy and Sadness in Children's Sports

Event Flier

More information

Sponsors:
JDL Series

This event was for coaches, parents, and youth sport administrators interested in and concerned about youth sports. The focus will be on children from the earliest ages of participation to about 14 years of age. The presentation examined the pros and cons of youth sports programs, including:

  • What are the benefits and the risks of participation in all types of youth sports programs?
  • At what age should children begin playing sports?
  • How much should they practice and play?
  • Is intense competition psychologically healthy or the root cause of bad behavior?
  • Do sports develop character in our youth or create “characters”?
  • What is the risk of physical injury?
  • Are parents part of the problem or part of the solution?
  • Are coaches prepared to meet the demands of coaching our youth?

As president and founder of Human Kinetics (the world’s largest publisher of information about the sport sciences, physical education, sports, and fitness) Martens has spent more than 30 years publishing books, journals, videos and online courses. His book, Successful Coaching, is the best-selling coaching text ever published, with more than 1 million copies sold. Martens is an Emporia State University graduate, a former professor of kinesiology at the University of Illinois and a former sports psychologist for numerous U.S. Olympic athletes. Martens is also an avid athlete, having earned All-American status as a member of 15 National Senior Slow-Pitch Softball Championship teams.


October 27, 2006 - Dr. George "Pinky" Nelson

Photo - Pinky Nelson, present day

Photo - Pinky Nelson, late 1970's

 

Topic:
JD Lecture -
Effective Teaching and the Structure of Elementary Schools: What the Research is Telling Us

Public Lecture -
The View From Space: What's it like, does it change your perspective, and why do we go?

More information

Sponsors:
JDL Series

12:15 - 1 p.m. - Jones Distinguished Lecture: "Effective Teaching and the Structure of Elementary Schools: What the Research is Telling Us"
7 p.m. - Public Lecture: "The View From Space: What's it like, does it change your perspective, and why do we go?"

Dr. George "Pinky" Nelson, a space shuttle astronaut and nationally known advocate for science education reform , will speak at Emporia State University in October. Nelson, the Fall 2006 Jones Distinguished Lecturer, will speak to a variety of audiences while he is in Emporia.

He is the former director of AAAS Project 2061. His publications include articles in a variety of astronomy, astrophysics and education journals.

Nelson believes the challenge for all teachers is not just teaching a subject, but teaching students how to learn, especially those in primary and secondary grades. Because the world is changing so fast, teachers can’t hope to provide the knowledge and skills that will be needed 20 years from now. Their best hope is to “help students learn how to learn things quickly and continuously.”

At the evening's public lecture Dr. Nelson discussed the unique physical experience of spaceflight, from launch to landing. He also discussed training for and flying in space and how it impacts those who have done it. Finally, Nelson talked about the risks and expenses involved in space travel and why exploration is important.


March 14, 2006 - Louis Mangione
Louis Mangione

Topic:
Kids Today! Using Current Research On Student Learning and Brain Function to Define Educational Goals

Sponsors:
JDL Series

Louis Mangioneis a dynamic presenter and an outstanding secondary teacher with 16 years of classroom experience. He has presented his innovative teaching strategies to educators at district, state and national conferences for the past 11 years. Best known for involving the participants in the learning process, Louis uses a hands-on approach demonstrating effective strategies for teaching all students, regardless of learning style, cultural background or special needs. Louis is the author of Instructional Strategies Designed for Block Schedules, Interactive Instruction: Actively Engaging Students to Enhance Learning, and Powerful Strategies for the Foreign Language/ESL Program.

October 13, 2003 - Roberts T. Jones

Photo - Roberts T. Jones

Topic:
Education and Workforce Policy

More information

Sponsors:
JDL Series & The Teachers College

Roberts T. Jones brings a unique perspective on the public policy trends impacting our nation’s education and business training systems. A lifelong advocate for investing in people, he is widely credited with helping place workforce development at the forefront of the nation’s public policy agenda. Jones served as the President and CEO of the National Alliance of Business, the Assistant Secretary of Labor under former Presidents Reagan and Bush, senior positions in two major U.S. corporations, and as Chief of Staff to two U.S. Congressmen. (More info...)

May 2003 - Dr. Patricia Cormier, President of Longwood University (Farmville, Virginia)
picture - Dr. Patricia Cormier

Topic:
Driving the Impostors from the Temple: The Accountability Movement in American Higher Education

More information

Sponsors:
JDL Series & The Teachers College

Since 1996 Dr. Cormier has served as president of Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia. Under her leadership, the institution has reaffirmed its time-honored commitment to preparing citizen-leaders to serve the common good, while positioning itself as a high tech, learning-centered environment second to none in the Commonwealth of Virginia. One of 15 senior public institutions in Virginia, Longwood is among the top five most selective in the state. Nationally recognized for its educational quality, the university is ranked among the top ten public institutions in the Southern region in the 2002 U.S. News & World Report college survey.

October 2002 - Ian Jukes, Technology Futurist
picture - Ian Jukes

Topic:
Living on the Future Edge

Sponsors:
Department of Instructional Design & Technology, School of Library Information Management, Phi Delta Kappa, Phi Kappa Phi, and Jones Institute for Educational Excellence

Mr. Jukes "works extensively with school districts, businesses, community organizations and other institutions to help shape preferred futures." Ian has both feet on the ground, but "sees" the future and how it is "connected" to technology and education. His message is universal and addresses the irrefutable education- and business-community connection that is becoming more important than ever for mutual survival and success in the wired age.

March 2002 - Dr. Lillian McDermott, Professor of Physics and Physics Education at the University of Washington, Seattle
Dr. Lillian McDermott

Topic:
Discipline-based Research on Learning and Teaching: The Key to Moore Effective Instruction in Physics and Other Sciences

Sponsors:
Department of Physical Sciences


October 2001 - Betty Castor, President and CEO of the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards
Betty Castor

Topic:
How National Board Certification Impacts Teacher Preparation Programs

Sponsors:
Jones Institute for Educational Excellence


March 2001 - Dr. Rosemary Caffarella, Professor of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies at the University of Northern Colorado (Greeley, Colorado)
picture - Dr. Rosemary Caffarella

Topic:
Learning Transfer: The Importance of Context, People, and Power

Sponsors:
ESU Department of Psychology & Special Education

 

Dr. Caffarella is a professor of educational leadership and policy studies at the University of Northern Colorado. She holds degrees in adult and continuing education and in rehabilitation counseling and community development. Most recently, Dr. Caffarella's research and writing has focused on building a new framework for thinking about learning in adulthood, the teaching of the scholarly writing process, professional development for faculty in higher education, and women and leadership. The author of numerous books, book chapters, and articles, her two most recent books include "Learning in Adulthood: A Comprehensive Guide, Second Edition" (co-authored with Sharan Merriam) and "An Update on Adult Development: New Ways of Thinking About the Life Course" (co-authored with Carolyn Clark). "Learning in Adulthood" received the Cyril Houle Award for Outstanding Literature in Adult Education. Dr. Caffarella is authoring a second edition of another book, "Planning Programs for Adult Learners," which will be published in the fall of 2001. In her personal life, Dr. Caffarella is an advocate for cancer survivors and research.

March 2000 - Dr. Genevieve Knight, Professor of Mathematics and Teacher Education; Scholar-in-Residence at Penn State Harrisburg
picture - Dr. Genevieve Knight

Topic:
Performance-Based Teacher Education: Blueprint of Fantasy?

Sponsors:
The Teachers College and Mathematics & Science Education Center

Dr. Knight is a professor of mathematics education and scholar-in-residence at Penn State Harrisburg. Although her background is in mathematics, service to teacher education constitutes approximately one-half of her professional activities; she is an advocate for women and minorities to be active participants at all levels of education and in the work place. For the past 37 years she has addressed education and social issues, mentored K-16 learners, advised undergraduate students, taught mathematics from pre-school to graduate school levels, and has been an active partner in the performance-based standards movement in teacher education. Among the many awards and honors received by Dr. Knight, the seven designated as "distinguished teaching awards" best reflect her dedication to students. The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) honored her as a recipient of the 1999 NCTM Lifetime Achievement Award. Her most recent award was the Quality Education for Minorities (QEM) Year 2000 Giants in Science for Outstanding Contributions to Science and Mathematics Award.

October 1999 - Dr. Gladys Agell, Director of the Graduate Art Therapy Program at Vermont College of Norwich University
picture - Dr. Gladys Agell

Topic:
Where is Mary's lamb to go? Models of Alternative Education

Sponsors:
Department of Psychology & Special Education

Dr. Agell, a registered and board certified art therapist, has been involved in the field of art therapy for over 30 years. Since 1979, she has been the director of the Graduate Art Therapy Program at Vermont College of Norwich University and is the editor of the American Journal of Art Therapy. Although her clinical work was in art therapy, Dr. Agell has added verbal psychotherapy to her private practice with children and adults since earning a doctorate in clinical psychology in 1990 from the University of Vermont. Dr. Agell has served as president and as a member of the board of directors for the American Art Therapy Association (AATA), is the membership chair of the Art Therapy Association of Vermont, has served on the Ethics Committee of the Vermont Psychological Association (VPA), and currently serves on the VPA board of directors as co-chair of the Legislative Committee. She is the recipient of AATA's Honorary Life Membership and the Ernst Kris prize from the American Society for the Psychopathology of Expression.

February 1999 -Dr. Allen Glenn, President of the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education (AACTE); Dean of the College of Education at the University of Washington
picture - Dr. Allan Glenn

Topic:
Preparing for the Next Century

Sponsors:
The Teachers College


November 1998 - Mary-Dean Barringer, Vice President of the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards (Southfield, Michigan)
picture - Mary-Dean Barringer

Topic:
National Board Certification: Reforming Teaching from the Heart Out

 


February 1998 - Dr. Sharon Robinson, Vice President of the Educational Testing Service (Princeton, New Jersey)
Dr. Sharon Robinson

Topic:
Taking the Measure of a Teaching Career

Sponsors:
Jones Institute for Educational Excellence and ESU Presidential Inauguration Week


November 1997 - Dr. Jesus Garcia, Professor of Social Sciences and Multicultural Education at the University of Illinois, Champaign
 

Sponsors:
Department of Social Sciences


March 1997 - Dr. Philip Kearney, Senior Program Director of the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards; Professor of the School of Education at the University of Michigan
 1997 Distinguished Lecturer: Dr. Phil Kearney

Topic:
The Improvement of Teaching: The Proper Focus on Education Reform

Sponsors:
Jones Institute for Educational Excellence


October 1996 - Dr. Nancy Crewe, Professor of Rehabilitation Counselor Education at Michigan State University
Dr. Nancy Crewe

Topic:
Functional and Performance Assessment: A 'Hot' Old Topic

Sponsors:
Department of Counselor Education & Rehabilitation Programs


February 1996 - Dr. Carol Shakeshaft, Chair of the Department of Administration and Policy Studies at Hofstra University
 

Topic:
Peer Harassment in Schools

Sponsors:
The Teachers College


October 1995 - Dr. Doris R. Corbett, Associate Professor of Sport Science at Howard University
Dr. Doris R. Corbett

Topic:
Changing Dreams into Reality Through Strategies, Choices, Changes, and Connections as We Confront the Agenda for the Year 2000

Sponsors:
Department of Health, Physical Education & Recreation


February 1995 - Dr. Patricia Shehan Campbell, Professor of Music at the University of Washington
Dr. Patricia Shehan Campbell

Topic:
A Worldscape of Music and Its Transmission

Sponsors:
Department of Music


October 1994 - Dr. Bob Algozzine, University of North Carolina
  Topic:
Special Education Inclusion

March 1994 - Dr. Barbara A. Sizemore, Dean of the School of Education at DePaul University
Dr. Barbara A. Sizemore Topic:
Teacher Education, Multi-Cultural

Educator, First African American woman to head the public school system of a major city (more info...)


October 1993 - Keith Gieger, President of the National Education Association (Washington, D.C.)
Keith Gieger

Topic:
Safeguarding the Integrity of the Teaching Profession

Sponsors:
Kansas-National Education Association and Emporia-NEA


March 1993 - Dr. Ronald L. Graham, Professor of Mathematical Sciences at Rutgers University
 

Topic:
Some Recent Trends in Discrete Mathematics

Sponsors:
Department of Mathematics & Computer Sciences


October 1992 - Dr. Madeline R Grumet, Dean of the School of Education at the Brooklyn College, City of New York
 

Topic:
Reading, Writing, and Ritual

Sponsors:
Department of English


March 1992 - Dr. James Barclay, Professor of Department of Educational and Counseling Psychology at the University of Kentucky
 

Topic:
The Regulative Theory of Temperament

Sponsors:
Department of Counselor Education & Rehabilitation Programs


October 1991 - Dr. Bill Aldridge, Executive Director of the National Science Teachers Association
 

Topic:
Science Education Reform: Its Connections to Research and Development

Sponsors:
Department of Administration & Teacher Education and Department of Physical Science


February 1991 - Dr. Norene Daly, Dean of the College of Education at Iowa State University

 

Sponsors:
The Teachers College


October 1990 - Dr. Carole E. Greenes, Associate Dean at Boston University
 

Topic:
Mathematics: A Time to Wonder

 


February 1990 - Dr. Rainer Martens, Adjunct Professor at the Department of Kinesiology at the University of Illinois-Champaign-Urbana

Rainer Martens

Sponsors:
Department of Health, Physical Education & Recreation


November 1989 - Dr. Gary G. Peer, Vice President for Academic Affairs at Adams State College
  Sponsors:
Department of Counselor Education & Rehabilitation Programs

March 1989 - Dr. Wilbert J. McKeachie, Professor of Psychology at the University of Michigan
Dr. Wilbert J. McKeachie Sponsors:
Department of Psychology & Special Education

October 1988 - Dr. Larry Lezotte, Director of Research & Development at the National Center for Effective Schools
Dr. Larry Lezotte Sponsors:
The Teachers College and Flint Hills Educational Research and Development Association

April 1988 - Dr. Madeline Hunter, Professor of Graduate School of Education at the University of California
  Sponsors:
The Teachers College and Emporia Unified School District
Dr. Hunter was nationally known for her work at the Corinne A. Seeds University Elementary School, the laboratory school of U.C.L.A.'s Graduate School of Education. She served as its principal from 1963 until 1982, when she became a full-time professor in administration and teacher education at the graduate school.

November 1987 - Dr. Sol Gordon, Lecturer, educator, and author
  Sponsors:
Department of Health, Physical Education & Recreation and Lyon County Health Department

September 1987 - Dr. Mary Budd Rowe, Professor of Science Education at the University of Florida

Dr. Mary Budd Rowe Sponsors:
Department of Administration & Teacher Education and Department of Physical Sciences

Science education innovator Mary Budd Rowe, whose mission was to put the wonder of exploration into science courses, died Thursday, June 20, in a Monterey, Calif., hospice. Rowe, 71, suffered a stroke June 14 while attending a conference in Monterey.

A visiting professor at Stanford's School of Education since 1990 and a professor at the University of Florida at Gainesville, Rowe perhaps was best known to teachers for her research on "wait time," in which she found that the average teacher doesn't wait long enough for students to answer questions in class. She found that increasing the wait time from one second to at least three seconds produced remarkable improvement in the language and logic of students.

Teaching to improve test performance produced textbooks that were "as dull as dictionaries," she said, and led children to learn facts by rote rather than understand scientific concepts. She contrasted this approach with the impromptu science lesson that Albert Einstein gave her when she, as a 7th grader, encountered him staring at a fountain on the Princeton campus. Einstein asked her if she could stop the water long enough to see the individual drops and showed her how to move her hands until she could create the strobe effect that appeared to slow the stream of individual drops.


April 1987 - Dr. Frank Farley, Professor of Psychology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison
Dr. Frank Farley

Topic:
The Type T Personality and Risk Taking

Sponsors:
Department of Psychology & Special Education


April 1987 - Dr. Robert Marzano, Director of Research of the Mid-Continent Regional Educational Laboratory
Dr. Robert Marzano

Topic:
Tactics for Teaching Thinking

Sponsors:
Department of Administration & Teacher Education


March 1987 - Dr. Richard Kunkel, Executive Director of the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education
Dr. Richard Kunkel

Topic:
New Developments in Teacher Education

Sponsors:
Department of Administration & Teacher Education


October 1986 - Dr. Ernest L Boyer, President of the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching
Dr. Ernest L Boyer

Topic:
Educational Reform

Sponsors:
The Teachers College

Dr. Ernest L. Boyer had a long and distinguished career in education. Since assuming the presidency of the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching in 1979, Boyer helped shape the national education debate. He is consistently cited as one of the foremost educators in the nation and in 1990 was named Educator of the Year by U.S. News and World Report. Boyer was Senior Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson School and education columnist for The London Times. He was a Visiting Fellow at Cambridge University and a Distinguished Fulbright scholar to India and Chile. He came to the Carnegie Foundation after serving as U.S. Commissioner of Education under President Carter. Prior to this appointment, Boyer served for seven years as Chancellor of the State University of New York, with its 64 campuses and 350,000 students. Boyer has written landmark books, including “High School: A Report on Secondary Education in America,” “College: the Undergraduate Experience,” “Campus Life,” “Scholarship Reconsidered,” and “Ready to Learn: A Mandate for the Nation.”